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The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora – known as CITES – is an international convention signed by 183 Parties to ensure that international trade in animals and plants does not jeopardize their survival in the wild. The treaty was drafted in Washington, D.C. in 1973 and entered into force in 1975. CITES, which stands for Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, is a global agreement between governments to regulate or prohibit international trade in endangered species. In the mid-20th century, governments began to realize that the trade in certain wild animals and plants was having a devastating effect on these species. These species have been extinct through unsustainable use for food, fuel, medicine and other purposes. And while individual governments can control what happens within their borders, they have no way of coping with the effects of international trade in these species. In 1973, 21 countries addressed this issue with the signing of the CITES Convention. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, often referred to as CITES (SIGH-teez), is an agreement between governments that regulates international trade in wildlife and wildlife products – from live animals and plants to food, leather goods and jewellery. It entered into force in 1975 with the aim of ensuring that international trade does not endanger the survival of wild plants and animals. The international agreement, known as CITES, aims to protect endangered wildlife. CITES is an international agreement to which States and regional economic integration organizations voluntarily adhere.

States that have agreed to be bound by the Convention (CITES « acceded ») are referred to as Contracting Parties. Although CITES is legally binding on Parties – in other words, they must implement the Convention – it does not replace national laws. Rather, it provides a framework for each Party to adopt its own national legislation to ensure that CITES is implemented at the national level. Widespread information on the endangered status of many important species, such as tigers and elephants, could make the need for such a convention obvious. But when ideas for CITES were first formed, in the 1960s, the international debate over regulating wildlife trade for conservation purposes was something relatively new. In retrospect, the need for CITES is obvious. Every year, international wildlife trade is valued at billions of dollars and includes hundreds of millions of plant and animal samples. Trade is diverse, ranging from live animals and plants to a variety of wildlife products, including food, exotic leather goods, wooden musical instruments, wood, tourist sights, and medicines. The degree of exploitation of some animal and plant species is high and trade with them, as well as other factors, such as habitat loss, is capable of significantly depleting their populations and even bringing some species closer to extinction.

Many wildlife species in commerce are not at risk, but the existence of an agreement that ensures the sustainability of trade is important to secure these resources for the future. CITES is a mature international treaty (a treaty is an agreement between countries) to which more than 150 countries have been members since autumn 2002. [ List of Party States] The objective of the treaty is to control the international movement of live or dead wild plants and animals, in whole or in part (« specimens » of species) so as to ensure that pressure from international trade does not contribute to the endangerment of listed species. Thus, living birds such as the imperial eagle, sea turtle shells, elephant ivory, and wild orchards are all controlled by this treaty when objects or specimens move from one county to another. The legal and illegal international trade in wildlife and plants amounts to billions of dollars a year. The illegal trade in items such as bear bile bulbs, elephant ivory tusks and other products is a significant problem worldwide. In addition to plants and animals and their parts, the agreement also restricts trade in items made from these plants and animals, such as clothing, food, medicines and souvenirs. In 2019, more than 5,800 animal species and 30,000 plant species had been classified. Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, Comprehensive Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, International Convention regulating world trade in wild fauna and flora adopted in March 1973.

The objective of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) is to ensure that international trade does not threaten the survival of any species. By 2019, the number of States Parties to the Convention had increased to 183. CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) is an international agreement between governments. The aim is to ensure that international trade in specimens of wild animals and plants does not endanger their survival. Every two to three years, CITES Parties meet at the Conference of the Parties (or « COP ») to assess how the Convention is being implemented. The purpose of the two-week meeting is to consider new proposals for the inclusion or removal of species from the Appendices, discuss other decisions and resolutions on the implementation of the regulations, and review conservation progress. Many internationally traded marine species are highly migratory, meaning they swim long distances and often cross national borders. Their preservation can only be achieved if nations work together.

This is where CITES comes in. The agreement provides a legal framework to regulate international trade in species, ensure their sustainability and promote cooperation among CITES members, also known as CITES Parties. CITES (pronounced SIGH-TEEZ) is not an organization, but an agreement that has now been signed by more than 130 countries to monitor hundreds of wildlife species whose survival is threatened by trade. Trade restrictions are aimed at regulating markets and reducing demand for endangered species so that their populations can recover. Member States, including the United States, meet every two or three years to review the status of these species, ranging from mahogany and large whales to exotic parrots and black rhinos. For many years, CITES has been one of the largest number of member conservation agreements, now with 183 contracting parties. CITES is one of the largest and oldest existing agreements on the conservation and sustainable use of nature. Participation is voluntary and countries that have agreed to be bound by the Convention are called Contracting Parties.

Although CITES is legally binding on Contracting Parties, it does not replace national laws. Rather, it provides a framework respected by each Party that must adopt its own national legislation to implement CITES at the national level. Often, there is no national legislation (especially in parties that have not ratified it), i.e. penalties due to the seriousness of the crime and the lack of deterrence for wildlife traders. [3] In 2002, 50 per cent of Parties did not have one or more of the four main requirements for a Party: designation of administrative and scientific authorities; laws prohibiting trade in violation of CITES; sanctions for this trade; Laws providing for the confiscation of copies. [4] Our editors will review what you have submitted and decide if you would like to revise the article. .